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Mardi gras maskMardi Gras is on Tuesday, February¬†21. No need to feel left out just because you are on Primal and don’t eat beans, rice or wheat flour roux. There are plenty of options for Primal Cajun food.

  • Try my “Gumbo” Stir Fry. Now that you are off wheat, you may like it better than “real” gumbo. Lots of my other recipes would work just fine for your celebration too. (I like spicy food.)
  • Primal Jambalaya sounds good, although I have never made it. Honestly, though, I would use rice not cauliflower. It’s Mardi Gras after all!
  • How about Spicy Shrimp?
  • Add some greens cooked in bacon fat, with plenty of red pepper flakes or other heat.
  • Yams/sweet potatoes with lots of butter.
  • Oysters?
  • Personally, if I wanted red beans, I would have them but considering the above, why?

By the way, in New Orleans and other places with Mardi Gras celebrations, they don’t wait until Fat Tuesday to start partying. Let the good times roll!

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FrittersClearly not Primal nor Paleo. OK for Archevore I think. Recipe is adapted from the February 2012 Prevention magazine. (One of the few things I have ever gotten out of Prevention. I was given a subscription.) I served with Cajun spiced fried chicken breasts and sweet potatoes. The fritters, themselves, are vegetarian.

Ingredients

  • 1 plantain or 2 bananas, mushed. I used bananas just barely ripe enough to mash.
  • 1/2 can Eden black beans, drained and slightly mushed. (Or homemade ones.)
  • 3/4 cup almond or coconut meal. (Original uses cornmeal, which I did too.)
  • 1 large free range egg.
  • Juice from 1/2 lime.
  • 2 chopped green onions.
  • Salt (optional).
  • Virgin coconut oil.

Directions

  1. Stir together beans and plantain or banana.
  2. Mix in meal, egg, onions, lime juice and salt.
  3. Heat coconut oil in large skillet on medium high heat.
  4. Drop heaping tablespoons in skillet and fry until golden on each side.

The image is a stock photo of fritters. I did not take a picture of mine and could not find a bean fritter stock photo.

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Meatloaf

Ok. It isn’t quite head to tail but it gives you some animal parts you might not otherwise get. Many ingredients are shown as optional. Add whatever you like.

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs grass-fed ground beef
  • 1/2 cup crushed pork rinds
  • 1 packet of Knox gelatin
  • 2 free range eggs
  • 1 grated carrot (optional)
  • 2 stalk of celery, minced (optional)
  • 1 onion, minced (optional)
  • 1 cup of chopped bell pepper (optional)
  • Salt, pepper, herbs, spices to taste
  • Some tomato sauce or ketchup (optional)
  • Tamari (1 or 2 tablespoons, optional)
  • A bit of chopped liver? (Optional. I do not use.)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to about 375.
  2. Mix tomato product, tamari and eggs.
  3. Sprinkle on gelatin. Let sit.
  4. Saute onion, celery and bell pepper lightly in oil.
  5. Mix everything together.
  6. Line baking pan with parchment paper.
  7. Form meat mixture into two loaves and place in pan.
  8. Top with ketchup (optional).
  9. Bake for about an hour (or until internal temperature reaches 160 degrees).

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I have liked and respected Don Matesz and Kurt Harris for very different reasons. Don makes interesting speculations. Kurt is very analytical. His approach to ancestral lifestyle is pragmatic, without lots of “me grok” silliness. But now they seem to have gone off the deep end and have a war going on between them.

After many years of promoting Primal and Paleo, Don made a dramatic exit in Farewell to Paleo. His presentation to the 2011 Ancestral Health Symposium was quite thought provoking. But now he seems to have completely gone back to the conventional wisdom approach of low fat, high complex carbs. In the process, he infuriated Harris.

Unfortunately, to me Harris’ response reminds me of Richard Nixon’s sad last days in office. The level of viciousness is way beyond anything justified by Matesz’s misrepresentations of Archevore. So, while I still think there is lots of useful information in both men’s sites, and while I still think of myself as close to Archevore with some input from Don’s yin-yang ideas, I am no longer whole hearted about sending anyone there.

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Did your friends and relatives shove an article in your face that seemed to say a high fat diet causes brain damage? Read the two following blogs and learn the truth. The study mentioned wasn’t about the effect of high fat diets. It was about how the brain changes when an animal (in this case rats) becomes obese. The researchers added fat to the rats’ normal lab chow to get them fat. (Dr. Guyenet was one of the authors of the study.)

Does a High Fat Diet Cause Brain Damage? Mark Sisson, Mark’s Daily Apple, 1/9/2012.

High Fat Diets, Obesity and Brain Damage, Stephan Guyenet, Ph.D., Whole Health Source, 1/2/2012.

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See ancestralhealth.info/vegetarian.htm

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Bowl of guacamoleMy guacamole has never turned out to be very interesting, until now. On a whim, I mixed avocado, lime juice and sriracha sauce, a spicy Thai paste of hot peppers, distilled vinegar, garlic, sugar and salt. (The sriracha known as “rooster sauce” in the U.S. is Vietnamese, made by a Vietnamese immigrant. But my Thai daughter-in-law uses it.) Ignore the “sugar” – you can’t eat enough sriracha to be harmed by the sugar unless you are Thai, Mexican or a person from some other heat-loving culture. (Joke. Not even if you are.)

Ingredients

  • Avocado(s)
  • Lime juice, maybe one teaspoon per avocado
  • Sriracha sauce. Start with a small dash and adjust

Directions

  • Peel and roughly smash the avocado
  • Mix in lime juice and sriracha.
  • Taste and adjust

You could add cumin, cilantro, tomato, onion or something else. I didn’t have them. And the recipe stands on its own. My approach to guacamole is K.I.S.S.

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